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  • Death of the Father - Thomas Abercromby

Death of the Father - Thomas Abercromby

700.00
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68 copy.jpg

Death of the Father - Thomas Abercromby

700.00

2015

Original Artwork

Stitched felt.

140 x 108cm

Shipped from Glasgow, Scotland by the artist.

Certificate of Authenticity included.
 

ABOUT THOMAS ABERCROMBY

“when you are poor and can't afford an over-coat the dirt keeps you warm” - Claude Monet


Thomas Abercromby (°1993, Glasgow, United Kingdom) Is a Scottish Contemporary artist and curator, graduating with a BA (Hons.) in Visual art from the University of Dundee.

Abercromby’s projects are based on themes that investigate childhood, social deprivation, sexuality and most importantly identity of ones self. By focusing on techniques and materials, Abercromby creates intense personal moments masterfully created by means of rules and omissions, acceptance and refusal, luring the viewer in with universal emotions, that the viewer can then empathise with.

By contesting the division between the realm of memory and the realm of experience, he considers making art a craft which is executed using clear formal rules and which should always refer to social reality. His works are being confronted as aesthetically resilient, thematically interrelated material for memory and projection.

 

 

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2015

Original Artwork

Stitched felt.

140 x 108cm

Shipped from Glasgow, Scotland by the artist.

Certificate of Authenticity included.
 

ABOUT THOMAS ABERCROMBY

“when you are poor and can't afford an over-coat the dirt keeps you warm” - Claude Monet


Thomas Abercromby (°1993, Glasgow, United Kingdom) Is a Scottish Contemporary artist and curator, graduating with a BA (Hons.) in Visual art from the University of Dundee.

Abercromby’s projects are based on themes that investigate childhood, social deprivation, sexuality and most importantly identity of ones self. By focusing on techniques and materials, Abercromby creates intense personal moments masterfully created by means of rules and omissions, acceptance and refusal, luring the viewer in with universal emotions, that the viewer can then empathise with.

By contesting the division between the realm of memory and the realm of experience, he considers making art a craft which is executed using clear formal rules and which should always refer to social reality. His works are being confronted as aesthetically resilient, thematically interrelated material for memory and projection.