RIOT ART GALLERY: A curated selection of art for the next generation collector

A curated selection of art for the next generation collector.

Delicate Brutality: An Interview with Svitlana Levchenko

InterviewsRiot ArtComment

Svitlana Levchenko is a fine art photographer from Kiev, Ukraine. Her style can be described as an aesthetic of brutality mixed with delicate emotional femininity, diluted with subtle perversion... and we are loving it! Svitlana specializes in portraying people and the world that surrounds them. By using different techniques to "complete" a photo, she fills it with meaning and life. This particular series invites viewers to explore the characters that live in Svitlana's mind. Her work had been exhibited both at home and abroad, and has been featured in several publications. Read on to learn more about this very talented photographer!

Love is in the Air....

Riot ArtComment

An original work of art is one of the most meaningful gifts you can give, standing the test of time and representing the precious, intimate bonds that we share with our nearest and dearest. Bring home a creative take on romance this Valentine’s Day and show your love by giving the unique gift of art!

Here are our top works to delight your valentine. Click on the image for more info!

Exploring Non-Duality: An Interview with Lisa Stewart

Riot Art

There is no doubt that as individuals and as societies we are constantly growing and transforming. Australian-born multi-disciplinary artist, Lisa Stewart explores just that with her intricate collages. Based in Berlin since 2012, Lisa's practice spans across sound, video, collage, installation, performance and live art. Her work invites the viewer to look sideways into mustier crevices of consciousness.  She has a particular interest in the fine line between history and mythology, often working with fable to illuminate fact and explore alternative timelines. 

In her interview, Lisa tells us how her series, Plasia, looks at internalised personal growth in correlation to rapidly ‘advancing’ (depleting) societies, allegorically reflecting an internal cleansing processes. Read on to discover more!

What made you decide to become an artist?

I couldn’t help it. I’ve always been drawn to the application of abstract ideas, dreaming up imaginary worlds, following strange thought spirals to see where they go. I think as a child I was really craving adventures that weren’t manifesting within my Melbourne suburban existence, which was often a bit too controlled and conventional for my liking. Art was one strategy for me to disrupt normality and bring more weirdness and magic into my life. This need then lead me to studying visual art at University, which then helped to push me onto the path called ‘artist’.

What drew you to collage?

I started doing collage as a way of visually mapping abstract concepts in my head that were surrounding larger experiential installations or ephemeral works that I planned to make. At first I only considered my collages as part of my ‘research’ process – but then after awhile I began to see them as works in their own right.

Tell us more about this series. What inspired it?

A lot of my collages work with the idea of “as above, so below”, where the microcosm is the same as the macrocosm, the exterior world a mirror for our interiors. This particular series “Plasia” looks at internalised personal growth in correlation to rapidly ‘advancing’ (depleting) societies. The works allegorically reflect internal cleansing processes, venturing deep into your own muck in order to release some of the junk that builds up. When we spend years in careless states of excessive consumption and exploitation of our resources things can get pretty degenerated, natural ecosystems get clogged or exhausted. You can see this reflected in landscapes around the world and in human bodies alike.

As individuals and as societies we are constantly growing and transforming. Through science and technology we can increasingly manipulate the world around us, we make things faster, more built up. We morph our environments at increasing speed through the constant transmutation of raw materials into products. Sands becomes glass, trees become vampire novels, metals become complex computing machines which in turn can transform thousands of animal remnants into bags of chicken nuggets in a matter of minutes. Matter is getting more and more mixed. Rivers, oceans and human bodies carry plastics and synthetic hormones inside their systems….

I don’t think its all doom and gloom, but it is largely unconscious behaviour. Something on one level we know we are doing, but are not ready to really address because it would mean having to change so many systems and ideologies.

What do you want to accomplish with your work? How are you doing this?

I like to open up new associations, new pathways in the brain.  My works offer viewers a chance to connect ideas that maybe they hadn’t considered side by side before. I’m interested in sharing the reality of illusion, how fantasy can be used to look sideways at a truth. My works seek to broaden understandings of Non-duality (the scientific, philosophical, spiritual concept that all existence is one, inextricably interconnected and that nothing exists in separation). Starting from the concept that all points in time and space are connected, my works envision alternative timelines, blurring pasts and futures to better understand non-linear time cycles.

My works tend to use a lot of humour. I’m often making small jokes with existing logic systems (eg. the format of a news broadcast or a day spa), using their own language to bend their interpretation into something a bit off. I do this to highlight the construction of experience and also to investigate the malleability of accepted realities.

If you had a superpower, what would it be?

100% Alchemy of the mind.

Raw Emotional States with Samuel Eyles

InterviewsRiot ArtComment

As you recover from the hedonism of the holidays, we have the great pleasure of bringing you the work of the talented Samuel Eyles. His large, stunningly grotesque paintings delve into the raw emotional states of his often caricaturesque subjects, and have titles such as "You'll always find me in the bathroom at parties" and "The gallery was boring so we took our clothes off"

You'll always find me in the bathroom at parties. Acrylic on Canvas. 72 x 84cm.

You'll always find me in the bathroom at parties. Acrylic on Canvas. 72 x 84cm.

Samuel's work address sociopolitical constructs and explores ideas around sexual repression as well as confronting our anxieties and desires, all while creating humour, through tension. Samuel graduated with a BA in Fine Art (Hons) from The Cass school of Art in London. His work has recently been featured in The Guardian and he's had several exhibitions throughout London. We had a chat with him to learn more about his work.

What made you decide to become an artist? 

I’m not sure really. I suppose I don’t necessarily think that you decide to become an artist; it’s just something you are. But perhaps as you get older, you realise that being an artist is more than just being good at drawing (in my case). You begin to realise what things interest you and what you’d like your work to comment on and then ultimately decide to make art your profession. 

Smoke some evil. Acrylic on Canvas. 72 x 119 cm.

Smoke some evil. Acrylic on Canvas. 72 x 119 cm.

Tell us more about your work. What inspires you? 

A lot of the time it’s me and my life, or distorted version thereof. I like to create cheeky scenes, which are both humorous and quite disturbed. I like to teeter on both emotions; I think that’s always my main challenge, to get the balance just right.  

I’m inspired by a lot of found imagery as well, these and photographs of my friends and family are usually the foundations for a piece. 

What is your artistic process? 

Usually an image will pop into my head, based on a funny situation or odd scenario. I’ll use this mental image for the structure of the piece, and then as the painting unfolds you begin to see the real story that you’re telling. The fun of the journey comes with the interesting qualities of the work you were never expecting. 

What do you want to accomplish with your work? How are you doing this? 

I’d like to entertain people and I’d like making people think. I also want to create work that people can relate to (in some bizarre way!) and I’ll do this by continuing to evolve my practise. 

If you had a superpower, what would it be? 

Hmmm, good question. I think I’d like the ability to stop time. Or to know where things are!

Shop Samuel's Work here.

Start the New Year in Vibrant Colour!

2017 Gift GuideRiot Art

Wishing you and yours all the best for 2017! May this year be filled with much love, joy and of course, art! 

Start the year in style with these vibrant artworks by some of our best-selling artists!

Simple Things. Rusudan Khizanishvili. Acrylic on Canvas. 50 x 50cm, unframed.

Simple Things. Rusudan Khizanishvili. Acrylic on Canvas. 50 x 50cm, unframed.

On the Mad Bridge. Marta Zawadzka. Acrylic, Ink and Spray Paint on Canvas. 110 x 110cm.

On the Mad Bridge. Marta Zawadzka. Acrylic, Ink and Spray Paint on Canvas. 110 x 110cm.

Emperor. Heloise Delegue. Acrylic on Canvas. 130 x 110 cm

Emperor. Heloise DelegueAcrylic on Canvas. 130 x 110 cm

Two in the Past. Trendafila Trendafilova. Oil on Canvas. 110 x 80cm,

Two in the Past. Trendafila Trendafilova. Oil on Canvas. 110 x 80cm,

The Allegory of Wisdom. Yuliya Martynova. Watercolour, acrylic & oil on canvas. 120 x 100cm.

The Allegory of Wisdom. Yuliya Martynova. Watercolour, acrylic & oil on canvas. 120 x 100cm.

The wildly colourful and expressive paintings of Marta Zawadzka

InterviewsRiot ArtComment

Dive into the vivid colour palettes of Marta Zawadzka with a selection of new works! Based out of Warsaw, Marta's work can only be described as wildly intense expressionist abstractions inspired by distant travelled lands. She draws inspiration from her urban surroundings in the production of all of her work, focusing on the importance of pleasure in harmony for the viewer. Did we mention Slash from the Guns N' Roses is among her collectors? Yes, we can see her soul singing!

Delicate Flight - Yuliya Martynova

Riot Art

We're delighted to feature the beautiful work of Yuliya Martinova! London based since 2007, Yuliya received her classical  art training in post soviet Kazakhstan. Then she spent most of her life working in a field of law returning to art as a full-time career and finding artistic identity in 2015. Yuliya's practice combines subtle watercolour techniques and colour intense acrylic blends that create vibrant, or to the contrast, delicate surfaces sealed with oil and alkyd mediums . 

The Wild Nature of Lucie Duban

InterviewsRiot ArtComment

This week we're venturing into the wild with Lucie Duban, a self-taught artist from Royan, France who has had several solo-shows at home and abroad. There is a playful and dreamlike quality to her work. Nature is at the core of her practice; her main inspiration. Her art deals with the invisible interconnections between each living being. 

Exploring Consciousness in the objects of reality - Trendafila Trendafilova

InterviewsRiot Art

We are pleased to present the stunning works of Trendafila Trendafilova. She is a young artist that is able, with a few brushstrokes, to evoke a Picassian, childish style of rare power. Trendafila's work is a depiction of her artistic transformation, an experimental self-expression through color, line and form, inspired by the presence of surrounding objects and humans. Colours and shapes are muscular and seem to explode from the canvas’ natural borders, all in a bi-dimensional representation that flattens reality down into a postcard of emotions. Their emotional reflection, in combination with the space of the here and now, the minimalism of time, explores a longing for experimentation and deformation of consciousness, colour and vibration.

Summer never has to end

Riot ArtComment

Whether you were sunning in Capri or covered in playa dust this summer, here is our selection of artworks that will help keep those warm memories alive, even as the air begins to cool.

ALSO! It's Berlin Art Week. Starting tomorrow you can feast your eyes on some of the coolest works Berlin has to offer. Check out the program here.

Capturing Club Kids and Drag Queens with Daniel Peace

InterviewsRiot Art

Daniel Peace has quickly received acclaim as a new London-based photographer for his striking work and individual style. His photography exhibits a strong fashion sense and takes conceptual influences from the likes of Andres Serrano, David LaChapelle amongst others. He has recently relocated to Berlin where he is shooting portraits of the city's nightlife and the people that make it what it is. 

Confronting your inner battles with Ana Mrovlje

NewWorkRiot Art

We have the great pleasure of introducing the Peacestool by Ana Mrlovje, a visual artist and psychoanalyst based out of Slovenia. The concept of the Peacestool was to build a monumental piece made out of the Great War's fundamental item: the bullet. The Peacestool, however, is not made out of bullets themselves, but out of what is left by the bullet after the action of shooting (the bullet shell). The stool materializes nearly 3000 echoes of gunshots. 

Inspiration from Stuart Semple

EventsRiot Art

Last week we had the pleasure of organizing an art night with internationally renowned artist, Stuart Semple. He led us through a workshop where he taught us how to "think like an artist". Stuart's story of overcoming adversity and following his call to creativity was truly inspiring. Today he's doing large scale public art projects and has done over a dozen international solo shows. Talk about living an authentic life! Check out the photos below.

We also have the great pleasure of featuring some of his work on our online shop. This pieces are only available until this Thursday so get your hands on an original Stuart Semple before they're all gone!

New Works from Daniel Segrove and Gabriel Centurion

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Check out these two new works from two of our most popular artists!

DANIEL SEGROVE

Daniel Segrove is an emerging mixed media artist from San Francisco, California who graduated from Academy of Art University in 2014. Daniel's work is about human emotion described by combining the outer physical expression of the figures with his inner self expressive abstract marks. He often works on burnt paper and other fragile surfaces to coincide with the fragile psyche of his figures.

 GABRIEL CENTURION

Gabriel is a Brazilian visual artist now based in Berlin, Germany. He completed his studies in Visual Arts from Campinas State University in 2003. By using vivid colours and portraying trite characters in destabilized environments, Gabriel forces us to review our definition of 'normal’. His work has been shown in several exhibitions both in Brazil and abroad.